Half Format 18x24 cameras (6)
Half Format CAMERAS 135, from 1914 to ours days

made in Japan (4)
Click on picture to see large model
Produced by Model description Year, Lense Picture
Konica Konica IIIm Konica IIIm it is a dual format camera: a removable mask on film plane make two effects: reduce format and engage shutter to work for only one stroke of the frontal lever around the lens (like in Zeiss camera), removing mask it's possible to take one 24x36 shot with two strokes of the frontal lever. So the first stroke advance half of film and cock shutter, the second stroke only advance another half of film (18x24mm). 1959, Hexanon 50mm 1:1.8
Konica Eye The EYE has a 30:1.9 to 16 scale-focusing lens, surrounded by a selenium meter. Focusing runs from infinity to 3.5 feet and can be set by distance icons in the viewfinders. The meter sets the aperture and shutter speed automatically and displays the set shutter speed in the viewfinder. The built-in selenium meter sets the shutter speed and the f-stop in a programmed exposure mode. At 1/30 the f-stop is f1.9; at 1/800 the f-stop is f16. For flash use, the apertures can be set manually with a 1/30 shutter. There is also a B setting for the shutter which sets the aperture at f1.9. ISO film speed from 10 to 400. Shutter speeds from 1/30 - 1/800. In low light conditions, a red flag pops up over the shutter speed scale to prevent bad expositions. Flash synch and cold flash shoe built-in. 46mm filter thread. Also marketed as the Wards EYE. The Soviets liked the design and copied it when they made the Fed Micron. 1964, 426g, Hexanon 1,9/30
Konica Eye version 2 The same of EYE but with logo olny in front, no over the top, and with accessory shoe. 1964, 426g, Hexanon 1,9/30
Konica Eye Wards like Konica eye, for exportation 1964, 426g, Hexanon 1,9/30
Konica Eye 2 Updated version of the Konica EYE. It has a 32mm (f1.8) scale-focusing lens with CDS meter. Automatic shutter coupled to meter. Flash synch. Shutter: Copal Auto 1967, Hexanon 1.8/32
Konica Eye 3 Updated version of the Konica EYE 2. 1967, Hexanon 1,8/32, Shutter: Copal Auto
Konica AA-35 It had a 24mm auto-focus lens, focusing to 3 feet to infinite. Built-in CDS meter automatically sets shutter speed (1/60 - 1/250) and aperture, in a programmed-exposure system. Although the focus and exposure were strictly automatic, these limitations are somewhat overcome by the other features, such as a built-in motor-drive, auto-exposure, and flash. First drop-in the film. It ran vertically, so the pictures come out horizontal, unlike most half-frame cameras. Then set the film speed (ISO 100 - 400) and you are set to go. The camera focuses the lens, then exposes the film, then advances the film. A RED/GREEN LED in the viewfinder tells you whether the exposure was correct or not. The camera had the same shape of the disc cameras of the time and it had a built-in sliding case to keep everything protected -- well, almost everything -- not the flash and the viewfinder. When the roll is done, flip the switch on the bottom of the camera and the motor rewinds the film into the cassette. The camera came in a variety of colors, such as red, grey flannel, etc.. No tripod socket, flash shoe, PC contact, filter thread or cable release socket. It is the same as the Konica Recorder. 1984, Hexanon 4/24g
Konica Recorder Same as the Konica AA-35. Shutter: Program 1964, Hexanon 4/24
Konica Konica Autoreflex The original Konica Autoreflex was spelled as two words, Auto-Reflex, on the camera body, or Auto-Rex on the Japanese market. The European version is called Revue Auto-Reflex. It was introduced in 1966, and has the honor of being the very first high-quality SLR with a metal focal-plane-shutter and automatic exposure control. It incorporated an instant -return mirror. It was also the first and only SLR to have the capability of taking half frame or full frame pictures, or switching between the two on a single roll of film. Which means, in half frame mode, on a 24 frame roll of film, you can take 48 pictures. The Auto Reflex was one of the first Auto Exposure camers, while at the time most other brands were Aperture Priority systems. The camera also has a verticle blade shutter, called the Copal Square 'S', the first camera to ever use this shutter. It was strong and accurate, but also quite loud. The Auto Reflex was also the first Konica to use the new Konica bayonet quick-mount lenses. Any new Konica bayonet quick-mount lens will work on any Konica SLR from the Auto Reflex onward, including the Electronic SLRs. Although rare, the Auto Reflex can still be found on the market place. ISO/ASA range 12-800. Shutter speeds 1s-1/1000, with flash sync to 1/125. 1985, 895g
Konica Konica Autoreflex P Konica made this marvel of engineering so that by shifting a lever you can convert a 35mm format into a half frame camera. This is the P model that has no internal metering and is a little harder to find. The shutter dial has 1-1000 B. Same model of Konica Autoreflex P marked by revue or Autorex P on the Japanese market. 1986
Konica Konica Half Pro FT-1 Same model of Konica FT-1 but dual format, like Auto-Reflex 1986
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Ricoh Caddy The first model in the popular Auto-Half series. The Ricoh Caddy is a small, simple, but fully functional camera, but quite a bit defferent from the much more familiar Ricoh Auto Half series. First, it dropped the spring-drive of the Auto Half. Second, it has a 25mm (f2.8) lens -- like the Auto Half -- but it was a focusing lens. The slightly-wide 25mm lens is equivalent to a 35mm lens on a full-frame 35mm camera. Focusing is from infinity to 3.3 feet. The other big difference was that the Caddy has full manual control of the f-stops and shutter speeds. Apertures run from f2.8 to f 16. The camera has a built in selenium meter and an EV-based manual exposure control system. The camera has a cold flash shoe, PC contact, tripod socket, and cable release socket. Accepts 25mm filters. Film advance is with a dial under the right thumb. It's harder to find than most Ricohs. Seikosha 1/4 - 1/250 sec. 1961, 396g, Ricoh 2.8/25
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD PMC Automatic Rapid Auto-aperture selection, accessory shoe, the Rapid system, based on an earlier system introduced by Agfa known as Karat, utilises two similar spool-less cassettes, the new one with the film in, the other as the take-up cassette, this would normally be the previous film cassette. 1966, 333g, Ricoh 2.8/25
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Auto Half The features that made it popular were its small size, automatic exposure and built-in spring-motor drive. It had a trusty four element, three group 25mm (f2.8) fixed-focus lens that would appear on Ricoh (and other) half-frames for years to come. The shutter had two speeds of 1/30 (for flash) and 1/125. The selenium meter around the lens controlled the exposure at 1/125. The spring drive could advance 25 - 30 exposures before winding was needed (It did not offer motorized rewind, like the Canon Dial cameras) Tripod socket and PC contact on the side. A cold flash shoe was available as an accessory and screwed into the tripod socket. Ricoh also made several flash units that screwed into the tripod socket and made contact with the PC contact (which is next to the tripod socket) -- a nice setup that they used on several of their cameras, not just half-frames. Also sold as the Standard Gatling 72, the Ansco Memo Automatic and perhaps other names. You can easily tell if you have this model because the shutter release is on the front of the camera. A flash and strange, rectangular filters that snapped on over the lens, meter and viewfinder were available as accessories. 1960, 295g, 25:2.8
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Standard Gatling 72 The same of Ricoh Auto Half sold under Gatling name, but with shutter release on the tob instead of frontal on the left of the lens. 1961, Ricoh 25:2.8
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Auto Half S The same of Ricoh Auto Half but with auto-shutter. 1965, Ricoh 2.8/25
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Revue Auto Half The same of Ricoh Auto Half S sold under Revue name. 1966, Ricoh 25:2.8
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Auto Half SE The Auto Half was not dead yet!. Ricoh came out with an updated version of the Auto Half E. This model has a self-timer added to the front of the camera. But no flash shoe on this model. A flash and strange, rectangular filters that snapped on over the lens, meter and viewfinder were available as accessories. 1967, Ricoh 2.8/25
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Auto Half SE2 An updated version of the SE 1965, Ricoh 2.8/25
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Auto Half SL This was basically the deluxe version of the Auto Half. It used the same body as the earlier models, but added some nice featurs. It had a focusing, 35mm (f1.7) lens (7 elements in 4 groups) with speeds of 1/30 - 1/250. Close focusing to 0.8 meters. The lens has a focusing scale on the lens marked with distance and symbols. Exposure was similar to the other models, and designed to be automatic. The ISO film speed 25 - 400, and the CDS meter set both the shutter speed and the aperture. The viewfinder had a special mark to aid in correct exposure settings, just like the SE. For flash use, the f-stop could be set with a scale on the top of the camera, like the previous models. This sets the shutter speed to 1/30. It still had the spring drive which was good for 25 - 30 exposures. Built-in self-timer (probably the "S" in "SL"), PC contact, tripod socket, cable release socket, and shutter release lock (probably the "L" in "SL"). Available in chrome or black. 1975, Ricoh 35:1.7
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD RICOH EE RAPID HALF Another big change in the Ricoh EE Rapid is in the meter. The camera has the same fixed-focus 25mm (f2.8) lens as the other Ricoh Auto Half cameras (four elements in three groups). Depth of field is at least from 5 feet to infinity. But now there is a circular selenium cell around the lens -- instead of the square cell of the Auto Half. This allows the use of more standard round filters (46mm) instead of the square filters that Ricoh had to produce. Like other half-frame, auto-exposure cameras of the time, the EE offers two shutter speeds. The first, 1/125, is used when the camera is in auto-mode. Here, the meter automatically sets the aperture from f2.8 to 22 and displays the f-stop in the viewfinder. The film speed is set by the Rapid cassettes. There is a small tab on the side of the cassette that pushes a lever inside the camera. This is the same setup that the later 110 cassettes would use and assures correct film speed setting -- quickly and easily. A very nice touch in such a compact camera. A second shutter speed, 1/30, is used for flash-mode only. Take the camera off AUTO and 1/30 is automatically set. Then the f-stop can be selected manually on a dial around the lens. While there is no built-in flash shoe, a cold flash shoe was available as an accessory and screwed into the tripod socket. Ricoh also made special flash units that screwed into the tripod socket, as well. There is a tripod socket and PC contact on the side. The camera also has a cable release socket. A very small and stylish camera, indeed, but much harder to find than cameras in the Ricoh Auto Half line. 1965, Ricoh 2.8/25
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Ricoh Auto Half E This slightly updated version of the Auto Half came to be used in a number of interesting ways. It still had the same trusty 25mm (f2.8) fixed-focus lens with four elements in three groups. It still had two shutter speeds. The speed of 1/125 was used for regular photography while 1/30 was used for flash. For normal use, the built-in selenium meter -- same square design around the lens -- automatically controlled the aperture setting. ISO from 25 - 400. For flash use, the f-stop is set manually with a little f-stop dial on the top of the camera. This automatically sets the shutter speed to 1/30. The viewfinder had a special mark to aid in correct exposure settings. It is a dot right in the middle of the viewfinder which is normally yellowish -- meaning "adaquate light". If it appears reddish, it means inadequate light -- use flash. Crude, but effective. Tripod socket and PC contact on the side. A cold flash shoe was available as an accessory and screwed into the tripod socket. The camera had a built-in spring motor for film advance. One wind of the spring advances 25-30 exposures. Another "improvement" was this model came with various flashy, colorful designs on the faceplate. You can easily tell if you have this model because the shutter release is on the top of the camera. The faceplate of the camera just says Ricoh Auto Half, but there is a big "E" on the top of the camera. A flash and strange, rectangular filters that snapped on over the lens, meter and viewfinder were available as accessories. 1964, 339g, 25:2.8
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Ricoh Auto Half E2 Same as the Auto Half E except that they finally added a flash shoe to the top of the camera. You no longer had to buy an accessory adapter. 1976, 311g, Ricoh 2.8/25
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Ricoh Auto Half ES2 1976, 311g, Ricoh 2.8/25
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Ricoh Auto 35 H Professional 1976, 311g, Ricoh 2.8/25
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Ricoh Auto Half EF The Ricoh 25mm (f2.8) fixed-focus lens with four elements in three groups was back, this time in a camera with a built in flash. This camera was the same setup as the Auto Half E, but with a built-in flash. In non-flash mode, the shutter speed was 1/125 and the selenium cell selected the aperture. In flash mode, the shuuter speed was automatically set to 1/30 and the aperture was manually selected based on the distance and guide number. Built-in flash guide number of 12 (meters at ISO 100). The flash required two AA batteries for power. Built-in self-timer, tripod socket and cable release socket. The viewfinder had marks to indicate adequate light (yellow) or inadequate light (red) -- use flash. The camera had a built-in spring motor for film advance. One wind of the spring advances 25-30 exposures. With all these features -- in such a small package -- it's surprising that it wasn't a better seller. Strange, rectangular filters that snapped on over the lens, meter and viewfinder were available as accessories. 1978, 311g, 25:2.8
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Ricoh Auto Half EF2 The Ricoh 25mm (f2.8) fixed-focus lens with four elements in three groups was back, this time in a camera with a built in flash. This camera was the same setup as the Auto Half E, but with a built-in flash. In non-flash mode, the shutter speed was 1/125 and the selenium cell selected the aperture. In flash mode, the shuuter speed was automatically set to 1/30 and the aperture was manually selected based on the distance and guide number. Built-in flash guide number of 12 (meters at ISO 100). The flash required two AA batteries for power. Built-in self-timer, tripod socket and cable release socket. The viewfinder had marks to indicate adequate light (yellow) or inadequate light (red) -- use flash. The camera had a built-in spring motor for film advance. One wind of the spring advances 25-30 exposures. With all these features -- in such a small package -- it's surprising that it wasn't a better seller. Strange, rectangular filters that snapped on over the lens, meter and viewfinder were available as accessories. 311g
RIKEN OPTICAL LTD Ricoh Teleca 240 This is another example of how the Ricoh Auto Half E was used. This was a pair of binoculars with a Auto Half E attached to one of the binocular lenses. The features of the camera were the same as the Auto Half E, except the speeds were increased to 1/60 - 1/250. The optic was the 165mm (f3.5) focusing binocular lens. A beam splitter in the binoculars diverts the image to the camera. Also sold as the Nichiryo Nicnon and the Nichiryo Teflex. 1971, 311g

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